thekimonogallery:

Women picking tea leaves, with garments protecting their faces from the sun.  Hand-colored photo, 1910, Japan.  Photography  by Tamamura Kozaburo

thekimonogallery:

Women picking tea leaves, with garments protecting their faces from the sun.  Hand-colored photo, 1910, Japan.  Photography  by Tamamura Kozaburo

(Source: Daily Mail)

ledecorquejadore:

Turkish coffee Set, Vintage, Coffee Service, Brass, Glass, Copper, Coffee Pot, Turkish Tea set with Tray, Coffee set, 22 ct gold

ledecorquejadore:

Turkish coffee Set, Vintage, Coffee Service, Brass, Glass, Copper, Coffee Pot, Turkish Tea set with Tray, Coffee set, 22 ct gold

kimono-nao:

龍都

kimono-nao:

龍都

kimono-nao:

撫子凛

drunkensword:

Weaponry in Reign of Assassins
辟水剑 Pì shuǐ jiàn (Water-shedding Sword) and 
转轮王剑 Zhuǎn lún wáng jiàn (King of Dharma Wheel Sword)

参差剑 Cēncī jiàn (Varied/Uneven swords)

短枪 Duǎn qiāng (short spear) and 飞针包 Fēi zhēn bāo (Flying Needle Set)

嵩山剑和嵩阳剑 Sōngshān jiàn hé sōng yáng jiàn 
(Songshan Sword and Songyang Sword)

杀人熊钩子和通天绳 Shārén xióng gōuzi hé tōngtiān shéng
(Leon Dai's Hooks and Rope) 

绽青剑 Zhàn qīng jiàn (Green Blossoming Sword)

武当三剑 Wǔdāng sān jiàn (the three Wudang Swords)

(via invictascientia)

nannaia:

A short illustration showing different styles of the Manchurian women’s wing-like headdress through early, mid and late Qing dynasty. When time allows, I’d like to create a much more in-depth version with many more drawings/styles. 


—NOTES—

“Manchu women of position generally decorated their hair with a small comb whose frame was formed with wire or thin rattan strips and covered with black gauze, on which were embroidered green feathers. The commoners mostly wore ‘fork-shape’ buns. Later under the influence of the Han women, they came to wear flat buns. However, the bun became higher and higher towards the end of the dynasty until it was an ornaments of fixed shaped in the form of an ‘archway’, capable of being put on the head at will after putting a few flowers into it, hence the name of ‘big wings’.” (5,000 Years of Chinese Costume, pg. 173)

“Manchu women combed their hair into a flat chignon at the back with horns supported by a hair board, which was also called ‘double horns hair style.’ Very beautiful and unique, they often decorated hair with big flowers of vivid color or tassels.” (Chinese Clothing, 81)

(via the50-person)

konetacho:

これぞまさしく葉っぱのお皿
masterpiecesofhumanity:

Giselle (Dutch National Ballet)

masterpiecesofhumanity:

Giselle (Dutch National Ballet)

(via poisoned-apple)

The language of traditional dress
Luis, luischumpitaz.com

A recent project about traditional dress in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) got us thinking about good old Roland Barthes. He famously interpreted fashion as a language, which, like all languages, is full of myths, codes and paradoxes; at once superficial and profound; fixed in some ways, evolving in others; always subject to personal interpretation, collective judgement and commercial exploitation. The subject is a fascinating one and Barthes published two books on it: The Fashion System (1967) and The Language of Fashion (2006).

While Barthes wrote about linguistic and industrial aspects of French fashion, we explored the unique nuances of clothing in this part of the world. As a team of non-Arab expat journalists, it was exciting to learn about the sartorial traditions in the Arab Gulf countries, with a special focus on the UAE.

As always, our Arab and Emirati colleagues supported the project with first-hand input and, in this case, even practical demonstrations:

Meaningful monochrome

Garments take on a heightened significance in traditional societies such as the UAE, where the majority of locals wear national dress every day, although this is a relatively recent custom. UAE national dress as we see it today only dates back to the 1970s, when the Islamic Revival, which brought a resurgence of Muslim religion and traditions, gained momentum. In the realm of fashion, this chiefly meant a return to modest, plain clothing coupled with a general rejection of Westernisation and commercialisation. At the time, many people in the UAE wore Western clothes or a mixture of Arab and Western attire, so the Islamic Revival created a new fashion mainstream, which not only manifested the country’s religious and cultural values, but also clearly distinguished nationals from expatriates. In a country where more than 80 per cent of the population consists of expatriates, Emiratis have come to use national dress as a way to differentiate themselves from the majority of ‘others’ and to express pride in their native culture.

Compared to traditional clothing worn in other parts of the world, it is striking how demure and uniform the sartorial cultures of the Gulf countries are. As shown in the infographic, Khaleeji (Gulf Arab) national dress commonly consists of a loose-fitting black cloak (Abaya) worn with a black headscarf for women…

… and a white ankle-length garment (Kandura) worn with a white or red-and-white headscarf for men.Whether in Kuwait City, Doha or Dubai, the colours worn in public are mostly monochrome, punctuated by the occasional, usually male, wearer of brown, grey or patterned materials.

- See more at: http://luischumpitaz.com/blog/the-language-of-traditional-dress/#sthash.KnCpOVO7.dpuf

(Source: arab-gulf, via invictascientia)

handa:

牛乳瓶シリーズ(*´∀`*)♪

#sunrise #sunset #moon #Airplane #sky #Milk bottle

(Source: a-kyouko, via 9861mzh)